Category: Pulp Novels

MOB Grind (Raid Online): A litRPG Stand Alone Adventure

“So long as we get enough out of this run to make it worthwhile,” she told him. “The last tomb we explored turned out to be empty. And we had to clear out the demons inside of it to boot.” She was the only member of the team who didn’t need to wear armor. As a healer, she could repair any damage done to her person so long as it wasn’t fatal. Enlil still didn’t think she needed to tempt fate, but whatever. They’d return to the starting point if all of them were killed.

Island of the Wolf

“The game is still in play,” Camilla announced. “The company thinks it can manipulate it, but there is too much already set in motion before they tried to alter the rules. There are some things they can change and some things they can’t. Yes, I still control the access point, but they may have found another one into this place. I won’t pretend to be a demi-god, not even in a virtual world. I realize Vince is still hooked up to his sleeping body and the two of you are programs that will eventually need to access your physical forms. Just listen to me and I’ll try to help you.”

WOLVES OF THE LOST CITY

The sequel to Wolf Mountain is now available: Seconds later the guns from the commando position opened up and bullets raked across the stone buildings around me. I felt myself scattered with stone chips and…

Living Legend: THE LAST BUFFOON by Len Levinson

The Last Buffoon by Len Levinson chronicles the life of a paperback writer in the late 1970’s. The writer is Levinson’s alter ego, Alexander Frapkin, a middle-aged Jewish man who is in the process of losing his sanity as he fights book publishers who won’t pay him, landlords who won’t fix his apartment, drug dealers whom he owes money, and a lawyer who has a very definite interest in the author’s love life.

Kim Oh #7: REAL DANGEROUS PLAN

Kim Oh #7; Real Dangerous Plan continues the Kim Oh series in excellent form. In this episode, Kim Oh, the tiny twentysomething Korean American gun woman, is stuck in the hellhole of the American Southwest. One thing I have to admit about Jeter, no one does a better job of portraying the depressive state of being lost in America.